While waiting for other kitchen renovations to get completed, I decided to make a change to the dining room table.

I recently ordered some new goodies from Iron Orchid Designs, molds and stencils, so decided to use them with some of the Heirloom Traditions Paint left over from painting the kitchen cabinets.

This table was given to me by a friend and it was the first project I ever did with chalk paint.  I had used a DIY paint formula using plaster of Paris.  You can find that recipe in my post about the chair makeover here.

Table Before It’s New Look

You’ll  see that we aren’t done with our kitchen renovation/new floors projects so there are tools and stuff all over. Don’t judge.  lol I’m no good at staging.

So, the process/experiment was to see if I could develop a nice old, chippy patina using the Heirloom Traditions All in One paint and some cheap crackle finish.  I have to say, the regular Heirloom Traditions paint does react with the crackle finish, the All in One, not so much.  But I did manage to get a chippy finish I am happy with.

So here are the products I used and I will list them at the end of the post for you.

Paints used for dining room tableI started with applying a light coat of the Heirloom Traditions All in One in Polo.  I wasn’t trying to get a complete coverage, just to have a dark base to start with.  This is on the leg of the table.

One coat of the color PoloOnce dry, I applied a coat of Artminds Crackle medium.  This is a Michael’s Art Supply store brand.  It is not expensive which is why I used it.  I wanted to see if it worked.

When that dried, I brushed a thin coat of the Heirloom Traditions Chalk Paint in the color French Toile, leaving some of the Polo exposed, especially in the crevices.  The French Toile is was* one of their regular paints, not the All in One.  It crackled beautifully.

Crackle finish on dining room table with chalk paintI waited until it was partially dry, about 15 minutes, and added another layer of the crackle medium using the brush to lift off some of the crackling, creating a chipped paint effect.  Let this dry.

Stipple on the Heirloom Tradition Manor House All in One.  Go back over areas that are drying and re-stipple without adding more paint. Again this creates a crackled and chipped effect.  I forgot to take a pic of this before the next step, but you can see what it does here.

Close up of Finished Application

This is a comparison of the effect, new paint on the left, old on the right.

Comparison of before and after

Once dry, I applied the Heirloom Traditions Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel in the crevices where dirt and dust would normally accumulate.  I applied this with a 1 inch artist’s brush and wiped back the excess.  The Antiquing Gel is very forgiving.  If you put on too much, take a damp rag and wipe it off and start again.

On my next post, I will show you what I did to add some love to the apron of the table and table top with Iron Orchid Designs molds and stamps.

 

Here are links to the products I used.  The Amazon links are affiliate links where I might make a few pennies if you purchase from them from here. (Links are for 8 oz size jar, other sizes are available.)

Heirloom Traditions All in One Paint in Polo

Heirloom Traditions All in One Paint in Manor House

Heirloom Traditions Chalk Type Paint in French Toile *(It appears the regular type chalk paint in French Toile is not available.  I have included the link here to the All in One in that color.  I am confident you will get the same end results even if it doesn’t crackle as well. Just use the same stippling application I used for the Manor House instead)

Heirloom Traditions Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel

Artminds Crackle Medium (available at Michael’s stores, not an affiliate link)

If you really want a crackle finish, I would suggest using the regular chalk type paints instead of the All in One.  However, you would have to seal it with an acrylic finish or a wax when done.

 

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