French Farmhouse Remodel


Don’t you just love spying an old brick wall with a painted advertisement?  It’s like a little surprise in a mundane urban landscape.  So when I finished my faux brick kitchen wall, I couldn’t resist.  And using a graphic with an ancesor’s name in it?  Just had to!

Using a Graphics Fairy graphic and easily enlarging the graphic with Block Posters, I printed out the graphic and taped the pages together.

The next step was to transfer it onto the wall.  I tried using transfer paper, but when I traced, the line was not showing up very well.

So, I took out a black pastel and rubbed the back of the graphic, a la kindergarten transferring!  Worked like a charm!  I could easily see my traced lines.

I used a white paint, in this case, I used Heirloom Traditions All in One Paint in Manor House (an off-white).  You could easily use a craft acrylic, but this paint is very durable, and I had it on hand, so that is what I used.  I then created a shadow on one side of the lettering in the same paint in the color Cobblestone (a medium grey).  I used a small flat artist’s brush and a liner brush for the curliques and the shadowing.  I watered down the paint a bit in order to make it flow easily for the detailing.  I admit I had to go over it twice.

My next step was to add a light coat of the off-white paint mixed with a bit of water where the grout of the bricks was to soften the lettering in order to appear more blended in those spots.

After it was thoroughly dry, I lightly sanded to blend with the brick work.

And there you have it!  The old advertisement! Subtle, but a pleasant surprise when you notice it.

*This post contains affiliate links (those that take you to products on Amazon).  If you use the links to make a purchase, I will receive a very small monetary gain which helps with my artistic pursuits!  Thank you.

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How do you stop painting the furniture you already painted?  I don’t know the answer to that!  As new techniques and new products come out, I want to try them all!

I recently bought some of the new to me Iron Orchid Designs products and I had to try them on one of my ‘keep forever’ furniture pieces.  So here is the top of the dining table makeover.

Here is what the top looked like before

I used the Heirloom Traditions All in One paint in the color Polo.  The stamping was done with a custom color of half Manor House and half Cobblestone.  And here is a close up of the stamping.  I combined several of their stamps around the edge and wreath design in the center.  I also tried out their new craquelure stamp.

I also finished it off with the Heirloom Traditions Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel.  So check out the whole table with the antique paint finish on the legs that I showed on my last post with the new painted top.

While waiting for other kitchen renovations to get completed, I decided to make a change to the dining room table.

I recently ordered some new goodies from Iron Orchid Designs, molds and stencils, so decided to use them with some of the Heirloom Traditions Paint left over from painting the kitchen cabinets.

This table was given to me by a friend and it was the first project I ever did with chalk paint.  I had used a DIY paint formula using plaster of Paris.  You can find that recipe in my post about the chair makeover here.

Table Before It’s New Look

You’ll  see that we aren’t done with our kitchen renovation/new floors projects so there are tools and stuff all over. Don’t judge.  lol I’m no good at staging.

So, the process/experiment was to see if I could develop a nice old, chippy patina using the Heirloom Traditions All in One paint and some cheap crackle finish.  I have to say, the regular Heirloom Traditions paint does react with the crackle finish, the All in One, not so much.  But I did manage to get a chippy finish I am happy with.

So here are the products I used and I will list them at the end of the post for you.

Paints used for dining room tableI started with applying a light coat of the Heirloom Traditions All in One in Polo.  I wasn’t trying to get a complete coverage, just to have a dark base to start with.  This is on the leg of the table.

One coat of the color PoloOnce dry, I applied a coat of Artminds Crackle medium.  This is a Michael’s Art Supply store brand.  It is not expensive which is why I used it.  I wanted to see if it worked.

When that dried, I brushed a thin coat of the Heirloom Traditions Chalk Paint in the color French Toile, leaving some of the Polo exposed, especially in the crevices.  The French Toile is was* one of their regular paints, not the All in One.  It crackled beautifully.

Crackle finish on dining room table with chalk paintI waited until it was partially dry, about 15 minutes, and added another layer of the crackle medium using the brush to lift off some of the crackling, creating a chipped paint effect.  Let this dry.

Stipple on the Heirloom Tradition Manor House All in One.  Go back over areas that are drying and re-stipple without adding more paint. Again this creates a crackled and chipped effect.  I forgot to take a pic of this before the next step, but you can see what it does here.

Close up of Finished Application

This is a comparison of the effect, new paint on the left, old on the right.

Comparison of before and after

Once dry, I applied the Heirloom Traditions Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel in the crevices where dirt and dust would normally accumulate.  I applied this with a 1 inch artist’s brush and wiped back the excess.  The Antiquing Gel is very forgiving.  If you put on too much, take a damp rag and wipe it off and start again.

On my next post, I will show you what I did to add some love to the apron of the table and table top with Iron Orchid Designs molds and stamps.

 

Here are links to the products I used.  The Amazon links are affiliate links where I might make a few pennies if you purchase from them from here. (Links are for 8 oz size jar, other sizes are available.)

Heirloom Traditions All in One Paint in Polo

Heirloom Traditions All in One Paint in Manor House

Heirloom Traditions Chalk Type Paint in French Toile *(It appears the regular type chalk paint in French Toile is not available.  I have included the link here to the All in One in that color.  I am confident you will get the same end results even if it doesn’t crackle as well. Just use the same stippling application I used for the Manor House instead)

Heirloom Traditions Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel

Artminds Crackle Medium (available at Michael’s stores, not an affiliate link)

If you really want a crackle finish, I would suggest using the regular chalk type paints instead of the All in One.  However, you would have to seal it with an acrylic finish or a wax when done.

 

This is a sneak peak because I’m no where near done this kitchen makeover and you know the saying, “It gets worse before it gets better?”

That’s where I’m at right now.

But I wanted to show you what an impact painted cabinets can make.  I decided to try Heirloom Traditions All in One Paint.  I usually make my own chalk paint, and I will probably continue to do so for small projects.  But for this, I wanted a professional product that would hold up on cabinets.

I was hearing great things about this paint. It has the primer, paint and top coat all in one product.  I can say that I am really impressed.  I used the color Cobblestone, a warm medium gray, on the top cabinets and Polo, a dark rich navy, on the lower.  I also used their Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel which I have used on other projects as well.  Their brushes are great to work with and are very well made.

I also replaced the hardware and used pulls from D. Lawless Hardware.  They have a great selection at very reasonable prices.

So take a look.

Chalk type painted kitchen cabinet.

I did a little distressing with the Cobblestone paint and added the Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel here.

Updated Painted Cabinets

Polo is such a rich color and the Weathered Wood Antiquing Gel created a degree of interest to it!

Updated painted cabinetsUpdated painted kitchen cabinets

These cup pulls from D. Lawless Hardware are just gorgeous!

 

Here’s a reminder of what these cabinets looked like before, just your run of the mill builder grade yellow oak.

Kitchen cabinets before renovation

So  much more to do, and I will keep you updated on the progress!

****This post contains affiliate links.  I only link to products I have used and like.  If you purchase some of these products from the Amazon links above, I make a small monetary gain which helps me with my stay at home business.*****

#heirloomtraditions  #dlawlesshardware

It’s been some time since I made a post about our DIY renovations.  There’s a reason for that.  We are slow.

But, today I’ll show you the painted faux bricks on the kitchen walls.

I’ll admit, I’ve grown a little weary of French Country shades of grey.  My Pinterest  page is full of the rooms of white and grey, but I just can’t make it work with the items my husband and I have collected over the years.  Sorry, we like color.

I started with some paints that I had in the basement left over from painting my bath.  That was before I found French Country, it’s more of a Tuscan feel.  The colors, available at Home Depot, were Behr’s Chai Spice, Warm Earth, and Home Decorator’s Collection Chenille Spread, which is an off-white. I also used some Valspar’s clear glaze,  and Mystic Sea paint available at Lowes, but any paint glaze would do.  For the base coat, I mixed one part Chai Spice and three parts white primer and rolled that on.

Making a Faux Brick Stamp

I created my own brick stamp using, of all things, adhesive backed craft foam cut into brick shapes and adhered to a piece of cardboard.  This worked really well.  The bricks are about 3 x 5 and 6 inches.  I staggering the ‘bricks’ for a realistic effect, measuring so the staggering is the same distance on each row.  That way, the bricks will ‘fit’ together when you stamp on the wall.  I left about a quarter inch between the bricks to represent the mortar.

I distressed the edges of the foam using the edge of a scissors blade and added some distressing to the inside of the rectangles by scratching with the end of the scissors.  This gives your stamping an uneven impression, which is what you want.  I made other stamps of various sizes to fill in spots which the large stamp didn’t reach, and one with bricks side by side for the top of the doorway.

Remember when you stamp on the wall to leave the quarter inch space between the bricks to represent the mortar.  I eyeballed keeping the rows straight, and I did a pretty good, but if you’re not comfortable with that, use a straight edge and level to draw a few guide lines on the wall before you start.  Start at the top of the wall and work your way down.

Stamping the Walls

Put a bit of the Chai Spice and Warm Earth in a paint pan. With a mini roller, roll on both colors at once.  It doesn’t matter if they mix.  You want a variety of color going on your bricks.

Roll and stamp, and sometimes you can stamp twice with one roll, giving a more subtle coloration.  If you feel the color is too dark, no worries!  The next step takes care of that.

Adding Subtle Textures

Once the bricks are dry, add a layer of white wash.  I used about a quarter cup of Valspar clear glaze mixed with about three fourths cup of Chenille Spread, and used a natural sponge to wipe a thin coat of the mixture on the wall.   Pounce with the sponge to give a slight textured look.  This will be very subtle.  Don’t go for big details.  Each layer adds more to the look.

When dry, using a 1 inch flat artist brush, I went back in with the Chenille Spread/glaze mix and added a fine line to the top and one side of each brick, blending in with the existing whitewash in the mortar line.  Decide which side of the brick would be facing the light and do the same side on all the bricks.  Highlighting and shading add depth.  With a small piece of natural sponge, shade the opposite side and bottom of some bricks with Warm Earth and Chai Spice on some other bricks.  Again, a very small amount of paint and a light touch.  If you find you got too heavy handed, as I did, go back and lighten it up by applying a small amount of Chenille Spread/glaze mix on a small sponge.

Also, pounce more Chenille Spread on the areas of your bricks that didn’t fully stamp to simulate weathered whitewash.  You can add as much or as little as you like.

The colors still appeared too uniform in color, so I took a stamp I made of one brick, rolled some of the Warm Earth and randomly stamped a few bricks, repeated with the Chai Spice, and then with the Chai Spice/primer mix.  This should be done sparingly!  I also intentionally did not press on the whole stamp on some of the bricks so they only partially stamped.  Back up frequently and look at your wall to determine where you think it needs some variety.  Don’t overdo it!

Making It Real with Patina

After all that is done, I used a small amount of Mystic Sea on my small sponge and added tiny pounces of it here and there to represent a bit of lichen growing on the bricks.  You can use any light blue or green color that is to your liking for this.  That color is just what I happened to have.

Here is a before and after of the progress so far.

My next post will give you an update of the cabinets painted with Heirloom Traditions All in One Paint!  Love this stuff!

This was a long post!  Thanks for hanging in there and reading it!

Lisa

Jeff and I took another trip north looking for the elusive fall foliage.  The warm spell put a halt to the colorful progression.  If you want to follow what is going on with fall foliage, check out his page.

We stopped at one of our favorite spots on Route 16, Our Favorite Things Collectibles in Albany NH.  We love to stop because the proprietor is such a delightful, spitfire of a woman.  I also wanted to stop because I saw something there last year that I didn’t pick up and was hoping it was still there.

And it was!

This is a milk crate from Ferland Dairy in Mexico Maine.  The importance is that’s my mother’s maiden name.  They aren’t direct relations, and I am still working to find the family connection.  All Ferlands in North America descend from one Ferland who immigrated to Canada in the 1600’s.  So, I have my work cut out for me to locate this one!

Collecting for a farmhouse look is great, but when you can do it with a family connection, even better!

It doesn’t take a lot of fancy, expensive paints to make over an outdated chandelier.  Don’t let them fool you!  You can get great results from simple, cheaper options.

Chandy Finished makeoverSo, if you’ve been looking into doing this, you have probably found other blogs who have used various name brand chalk and metallic paints. Here are a couple I loved, Diane’s at In My Own Style, and Amy’s at Maison Decor, and a zinc look makeover from Leslie at Colorways, whose chandelier’s style is much like mine was.

Sometimes you have to leave your chandeliers attached to the ceiling while you paint, but we were moving our light (along with the dining table) across the room so it was coming down, making the make over so much easier.

I also love to take apart my electricals and play with them!  I get so excited to start my projects, I always forget the before pics, but you’ve seen enough of these outdated shiny brass chandeliers, haven’t you?

My chandelier being taken apart.

My chandelier being taken apart

But take pictures of any funky ways things are assembled, like the way this wire goes around this part, so you can reference them when you put it all back together.

Take pictures for reference to assist in assembly later

Take pictures for reference to assist in assembly later

 

I took the whole chandelier apart and taped up the sockets to keep the paint out.  Then, started it off with a shot of Rustoleum antique bronze spray paint…. not much of this shows at the end, but I like having that dark base.

Then, I started layering my home-made chalk paint.  Here is my recipe:

Chalk Paint

For the painting process, I have some pictures from a lamp I painted the same way.

Shiny brass lamp to make over

Shiny brass lamp ready for make over

The paint I used on this project was made with a sample of Behr Chenille Spread, which is an off-white.  I used a chip brush and instead of stroking it on, I stippled it, which is a fancy way of saying I dabbed it on.

Antique Bronze spray paint and coat of white chalk paint stippled on

Antique Bronze spray paint and coat of white chalk paint stippled on

Next came a bit of blue chalk paint, this is called Provence Blue.  I used this sparingly.  I wanted to simulate a patina on old metal.

If you do too much, don’t worry.  Just put more white on top.  I would also use a paper towel and dab off if I put too much on.  I liked how that gave it more texture.

The next layer is a bit of brown spray paint.  I kept the can about 18 inches away and let it sputter so it spattered on the pieces.

Brown spray paint spattered on the white and blue chalk paint

Brown spray paint spattered on the white and blue chalk paint

Again, with the white, and if I wasn’t quite happy with it, I just kept adding layers until I was.  There is no right or wrong with this, just do what makes you happy.♥

To add a little shine, the last layer was a Ceramcoat Gleam acrylic craft paint in silver that I had on hand.  I used a foam brush to put it on and then used the paper towel again to rub it in.

Even acrylics can be used to add layers

Even acrylics can be used to add layers

Silver acrylic paint rubbed on as final layer

Silver acrylic paint applied on as final layer

Now to assemble the chandelier parts back together.  I wasn’t entirely happy with the original composition of the pieces.  I played with how they went together.  The top pieces were put back the way they had been, except I turned them upside down.

On the bottom half, I wanted to eliminate the big round piece.  I just didn’t like it.  It is easy to change things up this way.  I had some threaded rods from other lighting projects, but you can buy some different length rods at the hardware store in the lighting parts department.  Lighting nipples

So I just played with the pieces and the rods until I got something I liked.

The chandelier is now going to be a plug in instead of hard wired. (The outlet was wired to a wall switch, so we can flip the switch to turn it on)  I added the chain and attached the new wire to the existing wiring in the chandelier. Wire and chain can be purchased by the foot at the hardware store.  Adding the new wire is pretty easy to do.  All the wires to the various arms of the chandelier all come together in the center.  They were held together with pigtails (those little plastic caps).  Unscrew the caps, remove the old wire that went up to the ceiling and attach the new wire, re-attach the caps.  Done!  Thread the wire through the chain.  There are plugs that you can add to the other end of the wire to plug into the wall.  Ask a person at the hardware store to help you find these.

I also added some bling with glass beads from Fire Mountain Gems.  I used a small drill bit and drilled holes in to candle holders so I could attach the bead drops I created.

Look at the bling!

Glass beads attached to the candle holders

Glass beads attached to the candle  holders

Completed chandelier makeover

Chandelier make over

 

 

 

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